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Frequently Asked Questions

Please see note from Webmaster on the home page.



How can I subscribe to the Wilson's Disease e-mail discussion group?
How do I remove myself from the Wilson's List?
I'd rather get one e-mail a day that contains all the postings to the Wilson's List.
How common is Wilson's Disease?
How does a person get Wilson's Disease?
What are the symptoms of Wilson's Disease?
Is there a cure for Wilson's Disease?
 
 

How do I subscribe to the Wilson's Disease e-mail discussion group?

Send an e-mail to listserv@listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu with only the following in the body of the message (make sure there's no spaces in your name):
subscribe WILSONS-LIST Your_Name
 

How do I remove myself from the Wilson's List?

Send an e-mail to listserv@listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu with only the following in the body of the message:
SIGNOFF WILSONS-LIST
 

I'd rather get one e-mail a day that contains all the postings to the Wilson's List. Can I do that?

Yes! Send an e-mail to listserv@listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu with only the following in the body of the message:
SET DIGESTS
There's lots of other commands you can send the list server described here.
 

How common is Wilson's Disease?

One out of 30,000 persons has Wilson's Disease. This translates to 9,000 people in the United States and 200,000 persons worldwide.
 

How does a person get Wilson's Disease?

Most people inherit it from their parents. It is also possible for the mutation to occur spontaneously. One out of 40,000 people inherit Wilson's Disease from their parents and 1/120,000 (one out of four Wilson's Disease sufferers) have the disease from a spontaneous mutation. For more information on the genetics and inheritance of Wilson's Disease here is some info at the Wilson's Disease Association's site.
 

What are the symptoms of Wilson's Disease?

The symptoms stem from damage to the liver, spleen and nervous systom and span an enormous range of possible imparments. Although an exhaustive survey of symptoms has not yet been performed, the following have been commonly noted in persons with Wilson's Disease.
  • jaundice
  • cirrhosis
  • abdominal swelling
  • vomiting of blood and abdominal pain
  • low platelet count (thrombocytopenia)
  • tremors
  • difficulty walking
  • difficulty talking
  • difficulty swallowing
  • homicidal or suicidal behavior
  • depression
  • schitzophrenic-like symptoms
  • difficulty concentrating
  • inappropriate behavior (especially sexual)
  • insomnia
  • fatigue
  • aggression
  • menstrual irregularities
  • absent periods
  • infertility (in women)
  • miscarriages
 

Is there a cure for Wilson's Disease?

The only way a person can rid himself of Wilson's Disease is a liver transplant, which is only performed when necessary to save the person's life. The person will of course still have the genetic defect, and previous damage to the nervous system will not disappear (but may improve), but the new liver will be able to eliminate copper properly.